The work is considered to be from around 1280, thus preceding the Santa Trinita Maestà. It is also stylistically earlier to that work, being painted without pseudo-perspective, and having the angels around the Virgin simply placed one above the other, rather than being spatially arranged. The throne is similar to the Maestà painted by Cimabue in the Basilica of San Francesco di Assisi (1288–1292).

This work established a new canon for the Madonna with Child theme, which was subsequently used by other painters, such as Duccio di Buoninsegna in his Rucellai Maestà.
Ref : Here

Name : Bencivieni di Pepo

Born : 1240

Died : 1302

Art Style & Movement : Byzantine

Main Field/s : ,

Region/Nationality : Italian

Artist ID : 25143

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest

Although heavily influenced by Byzantine models, Cimabue is generally regarded as one of the first great Italian painters to break from the Italo-Byzantine style.[6] While medieval art then was scenes and forms that appeared relatively flat and highly stylized, Cimabue’s figures were depicted with more advanced lifelike proportions and shading than other artists of his time. According to Italian painter and historian Giorgio Vasari, Cimabue was the teacher of Giotto,[3] the first great artist of the Italian Proto-Renaissance. However, many scholars today tend to discount Vasari’s claim by citing earlier sources that suggest otherwise.[7]
Legacy
History has long regarded Cimabue as the last of an era that was overshadowed by the Italian Renaissance. As early as 1543, Vasari wrote of Cimabue, “Cimabue was, in one sense, the principal cause of the renewal of painting,” with the qualification that, “Giotto truly eclipsed Cimabue’s fame just as a great light eclipses a much smaller one.”[19]

 

Shopping Cart

Need Help?

Questions ! Comments ? You Tell Us We Listen .

Feel free to contact us

Add Your Heading Text Here

Shopping Cart